forever-an-addict

whatapreciouslittlefuckfox:

ailuroidea:

ifyoureallycared:

“People have decided how they are going to perceive her. No matter how many times she smiles, they’ll put in the one picture where she’s not smiling.” - Robert Pattinson

I’M SORRY BUT I CAN’T NOT REBLOG THIS

wow, it’s almost like she was acting like a vapid, emotionless, shallow, dead-inside character in Twilight because, you know, that’s what Bella is.

wow. acting. what a thought.

forever-an-addict

Reblog if you have fewer than 1,000 followers.

omgraniaposts:

unmasqed:

beaksunderwings:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

lillianorchid:

wrong-side-down:

god-of-gold:

jennstarkid:

tumblr nobodies, UNITE!!

i think you mean…

ASSEMBLE.

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for once the supernatural fandom didn’t arrive first

I’m proud of you avengers! 

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Are we late?

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We’re coming!

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Rebloging twice cuz it’s so awesome

everythingbaseballmlb

briancassella:

Created a fun challenge for myself shooting triple exposure photographs at the Chicago Cubs and White Sox home openers this week. Each image is three separate photos, composed separately but exposed on top of each other in-camera by the Canon 1D X.

The challenge was keeping track of the elements to end up with a photograph where all three layers of players could be deciphered. I was looking for players, fans and stadium details and trying to keep track of which ones I had already used in my head. In some cases I combined visual complicated scenes (like crowds) with simpler ones (like infield dirt) to keep the resulting image readable. I also tried to compose some layers with a lot of negative or dark space around the subjects so that those areas could be used for another layer.

Completing this exercise in a digital camera is no doubt easier than on film when there’s no way to check your negative halfway through, but it’s still a mental challenge. Once a layer has been loaded into the program to shoot a second or third, you only get one “click” before the camera has to spend time processing the composition, so planning ahead and shooting selectively is critical. I threw away plenty of misfires, but there were several I was excited to see pop up on the viewfinder as successes.

There’s more in the Tribune gallery HERE

(Brian Cassella / Chicago Tribune)